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Irony is the soul of Jane Austen’s novel because the comic aspects of life she presents in her novel are but the ironic aspects visible to good sense in its contemplation of erroneous judgments. In this context Bhattacharyya noted that irony is the hall mark of her style because this irony is not merely a particular way of saying or creating things (80). Irony in this tale is rather the expression of the infinite within a man who has at once a delicate, sensitive, and subtle perception of the contrasts and contradictions with which human life is filled.

The tale is in many occasions irony is a contrast between reality and illusion. For example Bhattacharyya says that the first sentence of the novel is tinged with irony as the sentence runs “it is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife” (81). This is not a truth that is universal to every man because the contrast appears to be true in most cases.

In the story pride and prejudice, irony is a mode of speech in which the implied attitudes or evaluations are opposed to those literally expressed. For example irony is depicted when Mrs. Bennet she says “My dear you flatter me. I certainly have had my share of beauty, but do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now, when a woman has five grown up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty” (Austen 32).

In these two stories irony is being used as an instrument of revealing the difference between appearance and reality is always a source of inspiration and amusement” (Bhattacharyya 81). This is depicted when Darcy remarks about Elizabeth that “she is not handsome enough to tempt me” and soon after gets captivated by a “pair of fine eyes” of Elizabeth” (Bhattacharyya 81). In addition irony of character is even more prominent in the novel than irony of situation. For example “Elizabeth prides herself on her perception and disdains Jane’s blindness to the realities is herself quite blinded by her own prejudices” (Bhattacharyya 82)

It appears as a surprise to Elizabeth that Darcy finds himself in love with her while the author Austen makes it clear how wonderful it is that such a man should fall in love at all (Polhemus 29). Irony is also depicted when Mrs. Bennet says “You are over scrupulous, surely and she continues to say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you” (Austen 33) In the beginning of the story there is more irony because the match was not very compelling because the reason why he fell in love with Elizabeth and marry her but at the end the match between the two looks perfectly reasonable.

Pride and prejudice shows how from historical perspective the association between the sexes where men could seem princes and women scullery maids. The ironic part of the story is depicted on the basis that though Elizabeth comes to love him by the end it is not at all clear that she ever falls in love with him because in their romance man falls in love with woman and that fall into love is the fortunate fall of Austen’s erotic faith (Polhemus 29).

The story further shows the readers that the world is often a sordid, dull, menacing, and disappointing place without love. In this context Austen says that “Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humor, reserve and caprice that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character” (33). The irony is that the power of love in pride and prejudice works to generate faith, hope, and charity.

Both novels make use of one common device throughout that is satire. Satire is a literary attitude used to make pleasurable aspects of character vices or weakness. This is done with the purpose of modifying the subject being attacked. Besides this satire utilized in the story confirms how excitement is poked at things that are collectively unacceptable and downplayed, creating an ironic sense of wit. Quintero says that pride and prejudice demonstrated satire when women in her tale were supposedly animated by sentiment. According to Quintero the definition of satire as a genre meant to expose vices for the purposes of correction lingers on in this novel (290). In addition Bhattacharyya says that pride and prejudice tale is not laughter provoking but they have a rippling sense of pleasure behind them (80). In this novel satire connotes moral purpose but the author never lashes human follies.

Satire is also demonstrated in the novel since the author does not reveal enough about what Darcy is supposed to be thinking. Walder says that “in Elizabeth’s crucial conservations with Jane, the antithetical technique, contrasting Elizabeth’s satire with Jane’s candor (231). Satire is depicted in the novel because as a whole intelligence is represented as faulty in the novel. The readers admire Elizabeth’s wit and sharing her lively and satire vision. Walder further says that reformation is not complete until near the end of the novel and everyone notices that the second, less satire and extrovert half of pride and prejudice is less enjoyable than the first.

Among the utmost and most exhibited satires in the story is illustrated through the most humorous man Mr. Collins. Mr. Collins character is rather hilarious in the entire text because of his apparent foolishness and his lack of understanding to his vices. Mr. Collins persistently acquaints himself with people of the superior class than his, for example Lady Catherine and Mr. Darcy who are regarded as high status people. He relates so much with these two people by the means of continued trips to the Rosins estate and Balls. Mr. Collins began to relate himself with Lady Catherine and Mr. Darcy, making himself comes out as higher class individual than he really is. With this phony sense of being Mr. Collins indisputably makes a fool out of himself giving the readers a clear picture of satire (MRU database).

Like irony, satire is employed in the entire novel Pride and Prejudice. This is because Austen starts to put across her own dissatisfactions of her own personalities and also reveals her own dilemma with the way in which society was footed upon class during her era. This application of satire becomes supplementary than just a mechanism that conveys humor to the readers. It is also a device that shows the communal issues that were there in Victorian England in Austen’s time making it an essential element to the story.

Satire is employed in Pride and Prejudice by the author to show the shortcomings in moralities and ethics of the subjects that Austen criticizes of. Satire is thus used hit at the characters in order to bring new changes. The type of characters she ridicules is ignorant in the author’s context. For example Jane Austen condemns Mr. Collins causing her to bother and satirizes him.

As a result of staying with Lady Catherine, Mr. Collins has demoralized himself. Satire in this context is evident because Mr. Collins imagines and speaks highly of individual’s superior than himself, such as, Lady Catherine DeBourgh. This is demonstrated when he was invited by Lady Catherine Mr. Collins tells Elizabeth who he was proposing to "Do not make yourself uneasy, my dear cousin, about / your apparel. Lady Catherine is far from requiring that elegance of dress in us which becomes herself and / daughter. I would advise you merely to put on whatever / of your clothes is superior to the rest /. she likes to have the distinction of rank preserved" (Austen 137).

Parody on the is depicted when the story explores that Darcy’s love for Elizabeth curbs his arrogance and makes him a kinder and better man (Polhemus 29). On the other hand Colebrook says that while irony in the pride and prejudice and zombies consequently delimits human life by positing an elevated concept that is not realized, satire examines life and its inherent propensities (108).

It can be observed that in this tale Jane Austen (1775-1817) parody is depicted in the way several characters take their local sentiments for universal truths. Colebrook says that “the author displays the blindness of the characters who believe themselves to be in simple possession of either a moral law or a social code” (108). For example in Chapter 2 parody is evident when Austen says that “Mr. Bennet designed not to make any reply but unable to contain herself” (40).

Parody in this novel is portrayed by the vanities and tendencies of human nature and they also present characters that arrive at fulfillment only through knowing and reflecting upon social nature of man (Colebrook 108). Again parody can be shown by the way Mr. Bennet commends when her daughter Kitty coughs “Don’t keep coughing so Kitty, for heaven’s sake! Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them into pieces” (Austen 43).

In addition, Austen shows parody through the art of fiction and recognition through examining the follies of others with a full perception of our own weakness. In this story parody assumes the common ground of man and therefore works against the traditional aim of irony and elevated or urbane point of view above and beyond natural life (Colebrook 108).

The novel pride and prejudice and zombies it is a complete parody but then it comes out in a complicated form. Austen has mirrored the original work effectively enough so that the flow is fresh and funny. In addition Ross says that the novel explores the purpose of parody that ranges from a playful imitation to harsh satire (49). The author also portrays successful parodies in which the element of celebration is clearly shown. This can be depicted when Austen says “But if a woman is partial to a man and does not endeavor to conceal it he must find it out” (41). This implies that Elizabeth can perceive her regard for Charlotte but then she says that he must be a simpleton, indeed not to discover it too.

Also in the novel Pride and Prejudice and zombies parody is depicted when Darcy says “which do you mean? And turning round he looked for a moment at Elizabeth till catching her eye, he withdrew his own and coldly said “she is tolerable but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men” (Austen 13). In this case the style in which parody is been shown is pretentious one because it is deflated by mockery hence its function is challenged so as to renovate and renew it (Ross 49).

Comparison and contrast between parody, satire, and irony in the novels

The novels illustrates that satire is the lesson while parody is the game. Ross says that parody can never have the force of satire because it seeks to undermine established attitudes in the author’s work (Austen 49). Darcy for example shows the original form of parody of the existing social order but it can be seen as an authorized transgression of norms. Again Elizabeth in both novels is displayed as the anti-heroine of romance a parody that accounts for the tough personality of the conqueror and her challenging of modesty by conversation and action.

The personalities and incidents in the novel pride and prejudice are used to give the audience a taste and critical sense of parody because every incident unfolds in a manner in which it advances the progress of the story. This can be elaborated when “Darcy walked off, Elizabeth felt her blood turn cold because she had never in her life been so insulted hence the warrior code demanded she avenge her honor” (Austen 13).

The readers can notice that the Elizabeth-Darcy story is told with surface romanticism and it contains most of the verbal irony of the novel” (Bhattacharyya 89). On the other hand it is important to note that “the Wickham-Lydia and Charlotte-Collins episodes are treated romantically with a solid foundation in social realism and with rather sordid and happy implications which in them the functions of parody comes out clearly” (Bhattacharyya 89). Another example of parody is through Darcy’s realization of his mistake that gradually leads to reconciliation between Jane and Bingley. Besides this we notice that Lydia’s sudden elopement with Wickham leads to the marriage between Elizabeth and Darcy and also Charlotte’s sudden acceptance of Collins’s proposal leads to theirs (Bhattacharyya 89). Parody is demonstrated in the above series of events because one incident leads to the occurrence of another event (marriage) between the characters in the novels.

The flow of the stories becomes uncharacteristically clumsy as one reads through the two novels. This is because Darcy’s proposal is flat while Richardsonian letter is untypical of him and lacks credibility (Austen 89). Irony is also illustrated when the reader realizes that the proud man is writing meekly to the girl who has rejected him unconditionally. Bhattacharyya says that satire is demonstrated through the novelistic technique of seduction as a suitable climax which Austen shows a standard chase by an outraged father, a friendly uncle and a now impeccable hero who makes devoted efforts to wed the scheming profligate Wickham to the innocent victim Lydia (90).

Satire is demonstrated by Austen in pride and prejudice and zombie when Charlotte says “I wish Jane success with all my heart and if she were married to him tomorrow I should think she had as good chance of happiness as if she were to be studying his character for a twelve month. He further comes out clearly and says that happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life” (20). Satire in this passage is evident because it appears like he is offering a lesson to Jane of what to do and learn when she enters into marriage.

In pride and prejudice as well as pride and prejudice and zombies, Jane Austen has given a multitude of characters that bring out the picture of irony, satire, and parody. This is because according to Bhattacharyya the characters are perfectly discriminated from one another as if they are the most eccentric of human beings (94). There is also a sense of pervasive irony in the characters of Jane Austen’s novel. Bhattacharyya says that “the irony is betrayed in her portraiture of the characters of Elizabeth, Darcy, Collins, Wickham and others” (95). Irony is the soul of the author’s comic view of life because she recognizes the antithesis in human experience that is the contrast between reality and appearance (Bhattacharyya 95).

Satire is illustrated through Collins character who besides being a humorous character. Bhattacharyya says that had it not been for Collins, Elizabeth and Darcy could not have come together as they do in the end (97). This is because it was Collins who first gave the information of engagement of Darcy and Elizabeth. Parody on the other hand is demonstrated through Mrs. Bennet who is seen as a woman of mean understanding because though she has been married for twenty years she is shown as unable to judge her husband (Bhattacharyya 97). Her remarks adds parody to the novel and at the same time she does not see the stupidity of Collins but tries to force her daughter to marry him though without success.

In summary, the functions of satire, parody, and irony in the two novels are evident. These three aspects in the two novels help us to gain a good understanding of the characters. They bring humor to the novels thus the comic characters used by the author are significant in different angles of the novels. They act as a guide and to an extent they portrayed in such a manner as to make satire, parody, and irony in their portraiture not too blatant. Satire, parody, and irony do not just give the picture but lets the reader make his or her own judgment

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Satire Essay Research Paper On Basis Of

Satire Essay Research Paper On Basis Of

Satire Essay, Research Paper

On Basis Of Our Reading, What Would Your Definition Of Satire

Be? Explain In Detail Why. An

exaggerated, often witty or ironic, indirect approach to express one?s opinions

or disgust with the aim to ridicule a desired victim. This is my definition of satire and

hopefully satisfies the areas of satire that need to be explained.

The satirical text written by Jonathon Swift in 1729 fit the above

description perfectly. The piece I refer to is ?A Modest Proposal. He wrote

about cannibalism but more precisely the consumption of young babies. He stated

that many children belonging to poor families were a burden and that by selling

or eating them could make them beneficial to the Irish public. This is an

outrageous statement and highly unlikely that Swift actually believed that this

method would really help the public at this difficult time. So this fits the

criteria in the first part of my definition. A Modest Proposal was exaggerated

and ironic. This then leads me onto ?indirect

approach. At the time that Swift writes, he lived in Ireland. The fact that he

could read and write alone was a rarity and showed his stature and importance

well. The English had taken control of Ireland and the potato famine had now

struck the nation. The piece was published in English

newspapers and some took its literal meaning: that Irish were turning in to

cannibals. Others saw the use of satire. This makes it an indirect approach to

ridicule the English, the desired victim in this case. I kept my definition brief because to

describe the uses and methods would take a far more educated than myself. Upon

reading further definitions a phrase caught my eye, which also defines satire

well but briefly. An artfully developed assault on a

topic or idea. This is good definition but only scrapes

the surface of what satire really is. Although the dates of these quotes are not

known (so a comparison concerning the date cannot be made) a general pattern is

followed. (Leonard Feinberg) Satire is a playfully

critical distortion of the familiar. (Molly Irvins) Satire is traditionally

the weapon of the powerless against the powerful. Both these quotes describe A Modest

Proposal well. Irvins is right in that Swift was a powerless civilian trying to

ridicule the English government. Feinberg also showed accuracy as Swift did

actually distort the familiar occurrences in Ireland. Molly Irvins? quote is backed by several other similar quotes. (W.H Auden) I have no gun but I can

spit? is a good example. This basically means that despite not having a

weapon (power) I can still make a difference. This demonstrates that the most

common satirists are powerless people. A dictionary definition is shown below and

should hypothetically be the most accurate of all definitions given. Satire: Poem, prose or composition, in

which prevailing vices or follies are held up to ridicule. Charles Dickens was probably the most

admired, inspirational and successful author in the Victorian era. I believe

that he used this fame to attack the education policies in England. Hard Times

was a satirical novel and did just that. I believe that through the character

of Gradgrind he aimed to ridicule the education policies. Gradgrind beliefs are that education should

be about facts and nothing else. His understanding is that without statistics

and calculations education will deteriorate. NOW, what I want is Facts. Teach these

boys and girls nothing but facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. The importance of the facts is indicated

by a capital letter. This hypothesis of education leaves students with no

practice in using creativity or imagination, which is what I believe that

Dickens disagrees with, especially being an author. Siegfried Sassoon also wrote a famous

satirical composition but this was after 1900 and was called ?The General. The

poem doesn?t try to put it?s meaning across indirectly but is a demonstration

of satire none the less. The poem begins describing the cheerful moods that the

soldiers and the Generals possessed at the start of the war. The later part of

the poem is discriminating the General?s judgement, attitude, lack of care and

general incompetence. (Cheerful moods:) ?Good morning, good

morning? the General said. The changeover in the mood of the poem is evident

in these two lines. Now the soldiers he smiled at are most

of them dead. And we?re cursing his staff for incompetent swine. This

changeover in moods is an indication to the public of how quickly the war was

over for some people and that the war was not as great as people made it out to

be. This, although, not indirect is witty and has a clear objective which is to

ridicule the English government and the people in charge at the time of World

War 2. There is however another adjective that was in my original definition

that isn?t used in Sassoon?s composition. This is ?exaggerated. It is unfair

and immoral to say that Sassoon?s poem was exaggerated as some terrible and

shocking happenings occurred in the Second World War. Therefore to judge what

is exaggerated or not may cause offence to the soldier?s who fought. There are many other examples of satire,

thousands in fact across the world today. Television programmes such as ?Have I

Got News For You. Goodness Gracious Me? and ?Harry Enfield And Chums? all use

satire in vast amounts to attract viewers. Have I Got News For You for example

exaggerates the current headlines and twists the headlines into something

humorous. This particular programme exaggerates the truth, is immensely witty

and aims to ridicule several desired victims. The texts written before 1900 tend to try

to attack the Government. I think this is because of the class divisions at the

times. Jonathon Swift, for example, lived in an era where there was a huge

class difference, as did Charles Dickens. After the social reform in England,

which occurred after the Boer War, things started to change and the class

divisions although still existent were far less noticeable. When Sassoon wrote,

at the outbreak of the war, the gap slightly increased between working and

upper classes. This was because the Government was needed to defend the country

and organise the war tactics and therefore the public was hugely dependent on

it?s government. I believe that as times have progressed satire is used mainly

as a source of humour. The Adbusters (adbuster.org) site was a site hosting

spoof adverts. Adverts were made to ridicule large firms such as McDonalds

and Calvin Klein. The designers of the advertisements believed that firms such

as these were giving an unbalanced diet and forcing youths to spend money on

their appearances and that their looks was the only important factor in life.

Through these images they aimed to ridicule the companies. They did this

however in a humorous way, which would attract people to look at the images. Generally I have found that uses of satire

before 1900 are very serious and are more often than not, trying to attack the

government at the time. After 1900 hundred, except in a few cases, the main

uses of satire is to produce humour. Simran Mahon 10SWord Count: 1200 words

Satire definition essay topics

Satire

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Gulliver s Travels Essay - Suggested Essay Topics

Gulliver's Travels Essay - Suggested Essay Topics

Part I, Chapters 1-4
1. Discuss Gulliver’s progress from chained alien to important ally of the Lilliputians.

2. Define satire and describe how it is used in these chapters, using examples from the text.

3. Discuss the transitions in the tone of these chapters, from travel book to description of an alien society to satire on English politics.

4. Discuss the relationships between Gulliver and the Emperor of Lilliput, Skyresh Bolgolam, and Reldresal.

Part I, Chapters 5-6
1. Discuss the decline of Gulliver’s fortunes in Lilliput in Chapters Five and Six.

2. Define irony, and how it is used in Chapters Five and Six.

3. Discuss Swift’s facility of changing from one narrative style to another, and discuss how these changes fit into the plan of the book.

4. Discuss the changes in Gulliver’s relationship with the people of Blefuscu.

Part I, Chapters 7-8
1. Discuss the total collapse of Gulliver’s position in Lilliput and its causes.

2. Discuss Gulliver’s disillusionment with politics.

3. Discuss the literary techniques by which Swift describes in a relatively few pages Gulliver’s transition from condemned criminal in Lilliput to returned traveler in England.

4. Discuss elements of political satire, satire of the human condition, and satire of the traveler’s tale in these chapters.

Part II, Chapters 1-2
1. Discuss the way Swift uses the difference of scale between Gulliver and the Brobdingnagians to literary effect.

2. Discuss the way changes in tone advance the narrative in the first two chapters of Gulliver’s second voyage.

3. How does Swift ironically comment on human frailty in these chapters? Discuss.

4. Discuss the changes in Gulliver’s relationships with the Brobdingnagians in these chapters.

Part II, Chapters 3-4
1. Discuss the attitude of the King of Brobdingnag to England, and Gulliver’s attitude toward it, as satire of human frailty.

2. How does the description of Brobdingnag in Chapter Four use the difference in scale between Gulliver and the Brobdingnagians? Discuss.

3. How does Gulliver’s trouble with the dwarf satirize human frailty?

4. How do Chapters Three and Four deepen the reader’s understanding of Brobdingnag in general? Discuss.

Part II, Chapters.

(The entire section is 1018 words.)

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Start your free trial with eNotes to access more than 30,000 study guides. Get help with any book. Gulliver's Travels Homework Help Questions My favorite is The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces and from an essay called "The Pride of Lemuel Gulliver," by Samuel Holt Monk. That essay can be found in the Norton Critical Edition of.
  • Swift is using Gulliver's voyages to satirize various aspects of English society. Gulliver's various conflicts in the lands he visits allow Swift to discuss a number of problems he sees with.
  • One cannot fully understand or appreciate Lemuel Gulliver as a character without first understanding that Jonathan Swift was a satirist and this novel is written as a satire of European.
  • The Brobdingnagians are a race of huge males and females. They are literally giants, over 50 feet tall. As a result everything around them is also gigantic and Gulliver is in complete danger being.
  • Gulliver's Travels is a parody of the travel journals famous during Swift's time. In the story, divided into four book, he satirizes everything from British government to science, politics.

  • Related Topics

    Satire definition essay topics

    English 2230.03 (Winter 2013) Satire

    Mona Campbell 1108, TR: 19:05 - 20:25

    David McNeil
    Office: 3193 6135 University (McCain Building)
    Office Hours: M 10:30 - 11:30; T 16:00 - 15:00
    Phone: 494-3508 E-Mail: dmcneil@dal.ca

    Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own.
    Jonathan Swift

    Swift's satiric definition of satire is one of many mirror-images that surface in discussions of the genre. In this class, we elucidate the dynamics of satiric humour in a wide range of texts from antiquity to the present. Although the readings are organized chronologically, the focus is on enduring forms (e.g. lampoon, high burlesque, character sketch, travesty and parody). The various subgenres of satire (e.g. verse, graphic and "Menippean") will be covered, as will its common targets (e.g. injustice, Quixotism, corruption, stupidity, conflict).

    Students will learn the basic difference between Horatian and Juvenalian satire, the elements of Rabelaisian rhetoric and the features of the mock encomium. A continuing project of this class is to compile a description of the Seven Deadly Follies. While the focus is on canonical texts, we will also make reference to contemporary manifestations, such as Rick Mercer's Rants. Bruce McKenna's cartoons, and Frank Magazine.

    Students with permanent or temporary disabilities who would like to discuss classroom or exam accommodation are asked to see the instructor as soon as possible.

    Class Participation (includes Attendance and WebCt) 10%
    Group Presentation 10%
    Mid-Term Test (in class) 20%
    Research Essay or Creative Project
    (Proposal due Feb. 27; Final Draft Mar. 20) 30%
    Exam (period, Apr. 10-26)* 30%

    *All students must be available to write an exam during this period.

    Class Participation:
    Students should be prepared to discuss the assigned reading as indicated on the syllabus. All students will be assigned to a group and each group will be responsible for doing one presentation to the class per term. (Presentation topics will be posted.) Other in-class activities and WebCT bulletins will also be considered as part of Class Participation.

    Research/Analytical Essays OR Creative Project
    Students are required to complete one research/analytical essay or project (creative and collaborative projects are possible). A list of essay topics will be made available by the end of January. Written proposals for possible creative projects (e.g. parodic skits, stand-up routine, cartoons) must be approved by the instructor by February 27. All creative projects must be presented to the class (either live or electronically). The deadline for submission of the essay or project is March 20. Essays or Projects must be given directly to the instructor on the due date. Do not submit essays at the department office or under the instructor's office door. There will be a one-mark penalty (e.g. B to B-) for each class overdue, unless an extension has been approved by the instructor prior to the due date.

    Students are warned not to plagiarize (see Dalhousie Webpage on Plagiarism ). Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of someone else's work in your own essay or assignment. Self-plagiarism is taking school work for which you have already received academic credit and turning it in again. In both instances, you are cheating by trying to receive credit that you do not deserve. ALL ESSAYS and PROJECTS for Engl. 2230 must be submitted to SafeAssign. Any apparent case of plagiarism is referred directly to the Senate Discipline Committee; the penalties are severe.

    Texts:
    For the most part, we will be using e-texts from WWW. Students should be prepared to print hardcopies and perhaps pay for a class packet of readings. Rather than printing an HTML page, students are encouraged to COPY/PASTE into a word-processing document (e.g. Word, WordPerfect), reduce the font, add your own annotations or notes, and ultimately compile your own anthology.

    You can access Electronic Resources here or on WebCt--everything you need to read is here. "Ya, Baby!"

    WebCT :
    This class makes use of WebCT, a software package that assists in the use of the Internet and electronic resources. Our class is located on the Academic server-just go to "Learning Resources" on MyDal.

    Syllabus 2006 (check WebCt for Updates)

    Jan. 9 - Introduction
    - bibliographies and curses

    " 16 - Juvenal, Satire III (Juvenalian satire)
    - Johnson's Imitation of Juvenal's Satire III
    - Horace, Satire 2.7 (Horatian satire)
    - Lucian, selected dialogues (satire and the dialogue form)

    " 23 - Chaucer's "Pardoner's Tale" (including the "Prologue")
    - Joseph Hall, Virgidemarium, Book I, Satire III (Excerpt)
    - Rabelais Gargantua and Pantagruel. excerpt, Book I, Chapters 3-4; 25-29

    " 30 - Erasmus - The Praise of Folly, excerpts
    - Cervantes, Don Quixote "Windmill" episode (Quixotic humor)
    - Butler, Hudibras. selection (Hudibrastic verse)

    Feb. 6 - Dryden, "MacFlecknoe" (lampoon, mock encomium)
    - Rochester, "Satyr Against Reason and Mankind" (theriophily)
    - Rochester, "The Imperfect Enjoyment" (sexual dysfunction and satire)
    - Behn, "The Disappointment"
    - Rochester, "Satire on Charles II" (obscenity and satire, see Freud)

    " 13 - Mid-Term Test

    " 27 - Swift, "A Modest Proposal" (power of irony
    - Pope, "Imitation of Horace, 2.1"
    - Montague, "Verses Addressed to the Imitator of Horace"
    - Essay/Project Proposal Due

    Mar. 6 - Swift, A Tale of a Tub

    Mar. 13 - Byron, "Vison of Judgment" (apocalyptical satire)
    - Haliburton, Sam Slick
    - Twain's "Nude Bathers"
    - Leacock, TBA

    " 20 - Orwell, Animal Farm

    - Essay/Project Final Draft Due

    " 27 - Satiric Song (lyrics), Graphic Satire
    - Performance Satire (Mercer, This Hour Has 22 Minutes )
    - Satiric Magazines

    " 10-26 EXAM (exact date and location TBA--you must be available to write the examination)

    Objectives:
    To trace the tradition of satire from its earliest beginnings in western civilization to the present; to gain a better appreciation and understanding of specific satiric texts; to develop skill in written and verbal communication, literary analysis, research and creative expression; to explain why so many great satirists come from Newfoundland; and, finally, to laugh away the general folly and vice of humankind (lest we drown in tears)!

    Difficile est saturam non scribere.

    A prize to the first person who posts a correct translation of this statement on the "Mail" function of WebCT!

    Updated: December 27, 2012