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Acet Application Essay Tips For Act

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ACET tips please?

Tall girls are winning. Lmao don't feel uncomfortable about your height. I'm 13 turning 14 on July 24th and I'm 5'7. Probably a half. And everybody in my class is SOOO short. There's probably two other people that are taller than me and they're your height.

Besides when you go to high school they're going to be so many boys taller than you or around your height, you won't feel like a giant anymore.

I say wear dresses and or skirts to show off your legs and high waisted jeans or anything of that nature. Remember tall people can pull off anything a short person can and maybe even better!

I've been homeschooled my whole life and did very well but this year my parents want me to go to a private school. I will be starting as a Sophmore. PLEASE give me some tips for going to a school? Like what I need to bring, what goes on, etc. ANY tips for a first time in an school. THANKS. )

don't bring anything, ask someone for a pen, and boom you've started a conversation with them. keep the convo going and then you've made a friend. its that easy. people always complain. also don't come out as gay. trust me on that one.

Any tips or anything before I go to bed for my English test? I suck at taking English tests so any tips. Oh and by the way I'm in 9th grade

Just read the text and questions clearly and use logic when answering. English is based on mostly knowledge. Good luck

I cannot afford to do crap in my exams after seeing my coursework marks today, any websites or tips and videos that can help really get an A? I seriously need to aim high right now, i do media as level, english literature as level, and business as level if theres any revision relevant to that too? And any tips you use that help you?

Hey, has anyone got any good tips for revision and studying. I have some pretty important exams coming up and I need some help with revision and studying, any tips, guides, websites etc. would be greatly appreciated! Many thanks.

Hai!
Let me tell u my route. I start preparing before 5 weeks the exams get start. I prepare a schedule for the units to be covered within the duration i have.
This schedule makes me to complete the lessons within the allocated time.
Some times if i miss or lack in any allocated schedule i don't completely omit the lesson, i just look upon the important topics of the lesson & carry on with the remaining schedules.
For every week, i revise the content that I've studied. Probably i try to complete all the units before the duration and start t revise the whole part. I don't study without revision. Because we human have the capability to hold the things that we've studied for not more than 3 weeks. Hence refreshing the brain is unavoidable. Then i don't believe that night study makes us tired.
I usually study at night. So choose the time of study as per your convenience. Leave intervals between hours you study. This will make you not to feel bored during studying. Take enough rest during examinations. Don't depend only on the books, refer the online lectures & simulations to better & rapid understanding of the topic you study.

There are innumerable websites available, you can google them. Prepare well for the exams. My best wishes.

Here are some links that contains the study and revision tactics,

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College Application Process & Tips

College Application Tips

Make a list of your target colleges, and check their websites for application details. Note application and financial aid deadlines and fees, and whether or not they accept the Common Application.

Check in with your counselor to learn each school’s expectations for the application process, including the procedure for sending transcripts and what's needed for the counselor recommendation letter. Don't wait until the last minute!

Understand the key factors in college admissions, including standardized test scores and Test Scores for Key Colleges . Here are some Key Factors in College Admissions to help you stay ahead of the curve.

Ask for teacher recommendation letters, and ask early! Colleges typically ask for one to two teacher recommendations and one recommendation from your counselor. Build solid relationships early, and learn how to line up letters of recommendation .

Keep copies of everything. If you apply electronically, make sure to print out every page of your application. If you submit a paper application, make photocopies.

Follow up with admissions several days after you submit to confirm each college received all your materials. If sending your applications through the mail, make sure that you purchase certified mail or delivery confirmation. Keep all postal receipts stapled to your application copies to ensure proof of submission by the deadline.

Here are even more application tips to help set you apart.

Common Application FAQs

What's the Common Application?
The Common Application is a universal application for undergraduate college admissions submitted online and accepted by more than 500 colleges and universities. It compiles the following information into one source:

  • Personal Information
  • Educational data
  • Standardized test scores
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Teacher recommendations
  • Personal essay

Do all colleges accept the Common App?
Most (but not all) colleges accept the Common App. The best way to find out is to check the college website's admissions section.

When is it released and available?
The Common App is released in early August each year, so you'll have plenty of time to build a strong application before the application deadlines. Get started early; you'll be thankful you did.

What are Common App supplements?
Some colleges require the Common App Supplements that include additional questions. Some are available on the Common Application site, while others must be submitted through the college's own website.

What makes an amazing essay?
The key to writing an amazing essay is to make it as personal as possible. This is your chance to provide the admissions board a side of your personality beyond test scores, GPA, teacher recommendations, or activities.

***The Common App lists essay questions to choose from and has a pre-determined essay length. Don't list your accomplishments and activities as there is a place for that in another section of the application. Do tell a clear personal story to show you have something special to bring to the college community.

Types of Deadlines

Rolling Admissions
Some colleges have rolling admissions, which means that they accept applications on a continuous basis up to a certain deadline. One major advantage of rolling admissions is that your child is notified of the college's decision soon after he or she applies, rather than waiting until March or April, when other colleges send out notifications.

Even though the application deadline is more relaxed, your child should not wait until the last minute. Generally, financial aid and housing are still give out on a first-come, first-served basis. While federal aid (including loans) will be available (if you file the FAFSA), scholarships are limited.

Early Action vs. Early Decision
Many students apply “early action” and “early decision”, but it is very important to understand the difference.

Early Action
With early action, students apply early (usually around November 15th), are not tied to just one college, and can make their final decision as late as the spring deadline.

Early Decision
Early decision means you apply in the fall and hear the good news by winter break. Colleges tend to accept more early decision applicants because the students who apply under early decision are usually exceptional and certain to attend.

However, there are a few things to consider before applying early decision:

"Do I really want to go to this college?" If accepted, you are bound to attend, and you cannot change your mind.

"Do I want to apply to other colleges, too?" While you can only apply for one college on an early decision basis, you should certainly continue to put together standard application packages for other schools.

"Do I fit the academic profile of the college?" If not, then early decision probably will not help your chances of getting in.

"Should I apply to OTHER colleges if I am not accepted under early decision?" Applying early decision should not be taken lightly. If you are accepted, most schools require that you attend. If you are not accepted, you may not be able to reapply that academic year. Make sure to check each school's specific policy, and prepare to apply to other schools just in case.

5 Tips for Successful Interviews

The college interview offers you an opportunity to stand out beyond the application with the admissions officer. It allows the admissions officer to get to know the student beyond the personal and academic information on your application.

Remember, interviews are just as much for the student’s benefit. It is your chance to discuss your strengths and interests in that particular school, as well as gather any additional information you need to make the best choice.

It's also a great idea to interview alumni from your college(s) of choice, learning from their insight and first hand experiences at college.

Here are some tips to help you do your best:

Review the literature about the college before the interview. At the very least, you want to appear knowledgeable about the school and keenly interested to learn more.

Be prepared for common questions. Admissions officers might throw you a curve-ball to see how you'll react in the interview. Prepare and rehearse your answers to potential tricky questions:

  • What was the worst decision you've ever made?
  • How would your friends characterize you?
  • What is your biggest regret about high school, and if you could change it, what impact would it have on you and in your future as a college student?
  • If you were a world leader, what would you do to heal the violence and turbulence in the world?
  • How do you see yourself 20 years from now?
  • Who is the most influential person in your life and why?
  • What are you reading right now?

Have your own questions ready. Some students say that the hardest question you'll get from the interviewer is, in fact, "Do YOU have any questions?" Don't be caught off guard. Having your own questions makes you look prepared and interested. Write them down on a notepad, and take it to the interview. This College Fact Chart will also help you organize your findings and guide your decision.

Bring along your notepad, a copy of your school transcript, and brag file of all your experiences. The notepad should include your prepared interview questions with space for notes, which will demonstrate interest and help you remember details discussed. The transcript and your Brag File of activities will come in handy if you are given an information sheet to fill out prior to your meeting. You won't have to scramble to remember things. It'll all be right there!

Be yourself. The key to getting admitted, and also being happy at college, is matchmaking. You want to bring your best, most authentic self so that the admissions officer interviewing you can decide if this is the right fit.

Remember your manners. Don't forget to thank the interviewer when you're done! Send a follow-up thank you email, mentioning some of the things you discussed in your notebook to help them remember you.

Line Up Letters of Recommendation

Admissions officers love to know what makes a student tick academically, and those in the best position to shed some light are the teachers.

That’s why most colleges require letters of recommendations, through which they learn about your personality, strengths, attitude, character, level of maturity, and special interests.

These letters have a very powerful influence on admissions officers’ decisions, so it’s important you choose a teacher who knows you well and views you favorably.

4 Guidelines for Choosing Recommenders for College Applications:

  • Approach teachers who know you well. If none come to mind, you should start to build these relationships immediately.
  • Select teachers from your junior or senior year. Colleges like a recent impression of the student.
  • Consider asking teachers whose subject may relate to a future area of study. For example, students who plan on studying engineering should ask a math or physical science teacher. A student interested in communications should ask an English teacher.
  • Choose teachers who can comment upon your growth and willingness to work and improve. Colleges are more interested in a student’s work ethic than natural ability.

Start the Recommendation Process Early

Approach teachers early, at least two months before the deadline. Many senior year teachers are flooded with requests for recommendations. Students who procrastinate may find these teachers are already overcommitted or unable to get the recommendations written on time.

Be clear about how the letter will be sent to the colleges. At some high schools, teachers file their letters in the guidance office and they are sent to the colleges along with school records. If your school does not do this, provide the teacher with a stamped, addressed envelope for each college.

Colleges May Require Additional Recommendations

Some schools ask applicants to provide supplemental references, such as a peer or an employer. The key is to select someone who you are close to that can offer a unique perspective about you that is not covered elsewhere. It is also important to pick someone who you know can write well. Be sure to let them know why you are asking, and give them an idea about what you expect from the recommendation.

Application Tips

Knowing "the tricks" can only get you so far. You’re always better off being yourself than trying to beat the system. For instance, applying to a program that's considered "easier to get into" rather than the one that you’re truly interested in can backfire.

Here are a few insider tips:

  • Be discreet about where you're applying. Having too many applicants from your high school lowers your chances of being accepted.
  • Let the colleges know you're really interested. Make personal connections with the college representative for your school and keep in touch. Many colleges consider "demonstrated interest" when making decisions.
  • Send thank-you notes after interviews, visits, or if an admissions officer has been extremely helpful. When they're reading your application they'll feel as if they know you.
  • Do your research. Go beyond the brochure, website and info sessions when answering a "Why this college?" message. Look for things that relate specifically to your goals. Show college why you're a great match.
  • Market yourself! If you do something special (art, music, photography) send a sample of your work.
  • Submit additional information, if necessary. If you had a special circumstance (e.g. disability, parent's divorce, death in the family, etc.) that affected your high school record, let the college know.
  • Proofread your application. Careless mistakes show lack of attention to detail, which is the last impression you want to give an admissions committee.
  • Practice for interviews. This will make you less nervous and better prepared.
  • Be honest. If you don't need financial aid—let the college know.
Completing the Common Application

Filling out applications for the countless colleges can be mind-numbingly painful, tedious and repetitive. That's where the Common Application comes in.

The Common Application is a single application for undergraduate college admission, used by a number of selective colleges and universities. Students have been using the Common Application for 25 years, and there are currently 230 member colleges and universities, both public and private, that agree to give full consideration to applications submitted on this one common form.

Find out if your school is one of them at commonapp.org .

How Do You Use the Common Application?
Paper or online.

Using the paper form (available in your guidance office or by downloading from commonapp.org), you complete one Common Application, photocopy it, and send it to any of the member colleges to which you want to apply.

Using the electronic version, you may either submit your application via the internet or print it and mail a hard copy.

Do Colleges Prefer Their Own Application?
No.

All Common Application member colleges and universities also belong to the National Association for College Admissions Counseling (NACAC), which requires that members not discriminate against applicants based on the particular form they use. Several colleges even use the Common Application as their own form.

Occasionally some colleges require a supplemental form of their own. At commonapp.org you can access supplemental forms to complete online and links to downloadable forms on individual college sites.

For further information, including a Common Application in paper form, contact the National Association of Secondary School Principals at 1904 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20190-1537—or call 1-800-253-7746.

Write an Amazing College Application Essay

The essay is not as scary as it seems. In fact, it’s one portion of the application that the student controls completely. This is your chance to provide the admissions board a side of your personality beyond test scores, GPA, teacher recommendations, or activities.

College Application Essay Topics

Typically colleges offer a number of topics on which students may write. These topics usually give a focus to the essay and almost always encourage introspection. Even when you write about a current event, the approach should be personal.

Each year certain social and political themes are common to a large percentage of the essays. It's fine to choose one of these so long as your perspective is distinctive. Admissions people don't care about what you believe but why you believe it. Again, it’s a glimpse into who you are as a person and how you think.

5 College Application Essay Do's and Don'ts:

DO be concise, specific, personal, and honest. Surprise the reader, and take chances that go beyond the obvious.
DO use wit and imagination, but don't try to be funny if that's not your personality. Forcing humor can backfire and comes across as just plain silly.
DO proofread and then ask someone else to proofread for you. Careless mistakes will drive the admissions board crazy.
DON’T be cynical, trite, pretentious, or maudlin.
DON’T repeat what is included in other parts of the application by essentially writing out your resume. Go behind the details they already know.

Lastly, review your essay with several people you trust—your counselor, family or your English teacher—and have them provide detailed feedback.

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© Copyright Kaplan, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

AP®, Advanced Placement Program® or Pre-AP® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product. SAT® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product. ACT® is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc. PSAT/NMSQT® is a registered trademark of the College Board and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation which were not involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.
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Kaplan Test Prep and ACCET

Kaplan Test Prep is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training or ACCET, a US Department of Education nationally recognized agency. ACCET promotes quality-oriented education and training through establishment of standards for its members and an accreditation process focused on integrity. Kaplan's programs are accredited by ACCET ensuring reliable and quality training at all locations. For more information about ACCET, visit www.accet.org.

Application Essay Writing

Application Essay Writing

Tip 1. College essays are fourth in importance behind grades, test scores, and the rigor of completed coursework in many admissions office decisions (NACAC, 2009). Don’t waste this powerful opportunity to share your voice and express who you really are to colleges. Great life stories make you jump off the page and into your match colleges.

Tip 2. Develop an overall strategic essay writing plan. College essays should work together to help you communicate key qualities and stories not available anywhere else in your application.

Tip 3. Keep a chart of all essays required by each college, including short responses and optional essays. View each essay or short response as a chance to tell a new story and to share your core qualities. Remember, our WEBSITE-IPHONE/IPAD APP: ALL COLLEGE APPLICATION ESSAYS provides all essays required for every major public and private college in the US. www.allcollegeessays.org .

Tip 4. Look for patterns between colleges essay requirements so that you can find ways to use essays more than once. This holds true for scholarship essays.

Tip 5. Plan to share positive messages and powerful outcomes. You can start with life or family challenges. You can describe obstacles you have overcome. You can reflect on your growth and development, including accomplishments and service. College admissions officers do not read minds, so tell them your powerful life stories.

Tip 6. Always write in the first person. Remember, these are autobiographical essays, even when you talk about other people. Remember the colleges are looking to accept you, not your relatives. So use the one third and two thirds rule. If you choose to write about someone or something else, you must show how it affected you for the majority of the essay. Your essays show colleges why you belong on college campuses and share how you will enrich diverse communities.

Tip 7. Follow Dr. Joseph’s Into, Through, and Beyond approach. Lead the reader INTO your story with a powerful beginning—a story, an experience. Take them THROUGH your story with the context and keys parts of your story. End with the BEYOND message about how this story has affected you are now and who you want to be in college and potentially after college.

The beyond can be implied in many pieces that are so strong that moralizing at the end is not necessary.

  • It is not just the story that counts.
  • It’s the choice of qualities a student wants the college to know about herself

Tip 8. Use active writing: avoid passive sentences and incorporate power verbs. Show when possible; tell when summarizing.

Tip 9. Have trusted inside and impartial outside readers read your essays. Make sure you have no spelling or grammatical errors.

Tip 10. Most importantly, make yourself come alive throughout this process. Write about yourself as passionately and powerfully as possible. Be proud of your life and accomplishments. Sell yourself.

Recent Posts

College Application Tips

Young Men's Health College Application Tips

Good grades and test scores are important, but there are other ways to make your college application competitive.

Here are our top 10 tips to help you get into the colleges you want:

1. Start thinking about college in your junior year (or earlier)

It’s a good idea to begin gathering information, attending college fairs, and meeting with your guidance counselor to talk about schools as early as possible. Starting this process early will give you time to find the colleges that are the best fit for you.

  • The best place to start your research is the internet – you can find information about each school using websites, such as collegeboard.org or http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges .
  • When looking for schools, think about location, class size, curriculum, campus, atmosphere, number of students, variety of majors offered, tuition price, minimum GPA and SAT/ACT score accepted, etc.
  • Most colleges/universities use the Common App, an online service that allows you to use the same application for multiple schools.
  • Create an account on commonapp.org the summer before your senior year and start filling out general info, such as your name and address.
2. Prepare for the SAT or ACT

It’s never too early to start preparing for the SAT or ACT test. Begin preparation during your sophomore year summer or the fall of your junior year of high school. Then you will have enough time to prepare for the exam or re-take the exam.

  • Before taking either the SAT or ACT it’s a good idea to become familiar with the format and timing of the test, and the kinds of questions you might expect to see. You could buy a book or take a class that can help prepare you for the SAT/ACT exams. Many high schools or community centers offer these classes at no charge. Other prep classes (such as Kaplan or the Princeton Review) charge a fee. Assess what kind of learner you are. Are you an independent learner who likes to study at your own pace? Or do you prefer the structure of a classroom?
  • Don’t get discouraged if you didn’t do as well as you’d like on the SAT or ACT the first or even the second time around. You can take both of these tests again.
  • Standardized testing isn’t for everyone. Some colleges are starting to accept applications without test scores. Find out more information .
  • Some colleges and programs require that you take SAT Subject Tests, so keep an eye out for what each college requires and plan you’re studying accordingly.
3. Take the time to do the things that you’re passionate about

Colleges want to know what you are passionate about and what gets you excited. You want your passions and interests to shine through in your application.

  • For example, if you really like painting, then take art classes, paint, volunteer to teach younger kids to paint, or make a website displaying your artwork. (You can let colleges know about your interests and hobbies in your application.)
  • Participating in summer programs, volunteering at a summer camp, or working over the summer will show colleges that you spent your vacations doing something productive and that you’re committed.
4. Keep a list of activities

Keep a running list of all the activities that you’ve been involved with since your freshman year in high school so you have something to refer to when you’re filling out college applications.

  • On your list, include the dates, the number of hours, and contact information for each of your extracurricular, volunteer, and work activities.
  • Don’t forget to include both paid and unpaid activities on this list.
5. Plan your recommendation letters

Most schools require at least 2 letters of recommendation from your teachers or supervisors that you have volunteered or interned for.

  • Request letters from teachers who know you best, whose class you’ve received the best grades in, or from teachers whose class you’ve shown the greatest improvement in.
  • Once you have finalized who you would like to ask for a letter of recommendation, be sure to ask them politely and preferably in person – not via email.
  • Find out if the person you selected is willing to write your letter of recommendation and how far in advance they want to receive the paperwork.
  • Provide your teacher(s) and/or supervisor with a stamped envelope with the address of the school you’re sending the letter to. Be sure to double check the address so that the letters get sent to the right place.
  • When you ask for a letter, provide your teachers with a resume, list of your activities, and/or your personal statement for the college. It might also be helpful for you to tell them what you’ve achieved in their class.
6. Write an admissions essay that stands out

College and university admission’s staff get tons of essays – they want to read something that will help them get a sense of who you are.

  • Write about something that you feel strongly about. This will make it easier for you to compose the essay and those that read it will be able to see your passion.
  • Keep your essays concise and to the point (especially because you are given a word limit) and follow the required guidelines set by each school (some schools require the essay to be about a specific topic).
  • If you are having trouble finding a topic, talk with a teacher (it may be your English teacher) or an adult that you are close with. He or she may be able to help guide you and give you a couple of ideas.
7. Use the spell-check tool

Every year colleges and universities receive applications and essays filled with spelling and grammar mistakes. Don’t let this be you. Before mailing your essay or hitting the “send” button on your computer:

  • Use the spell-check tool in your word processor.
  • Have someone (parent, teacher, guidance counselor) proof-read your essay and give you feedback before you send it – the more eyes that read the paper, the better.
8. Know about financial aid options

College is expensive, but there are scholarships, grants, and loans. Set aside time to look for them.

  • Start searching as soon as possible because many scholarship applications are due in the winter of your senior year.
  • Sign up for scholarships by searching them on websites such as: fastweb.com and scholarships.com .
  • Ask your teachers and guidance counselors about available scholarships in your community.
  • Check out whether the schools you’re applying to offer scholarships for incoming freshmen.
  • If you need help paying for college, submit a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) before you start college, and each year thereafter. This form will determine whether you’re eligible for grants, loans, or work-study programs.

If you need financial assistance applying for college:

  • Some schools offer application fee waivers if they see that the applicant can’t afford the fee or if they attend the school’s open house or tour. Call the admissions office and ask for more information.
  • Collegeboard also gives fee waivers to students who receive free or reduced lunch. Ask your guidance counselor about these programs.
9. Stay organized

The college application process can get overwhelming. Colleges may ask for several essays, there’s lots of paperwork to fill out, and the various schools that you’re applying to may have different deadlines and individual essays as well.

  • Create a chart or an excel spreadsheet to organize all the important information for each school, such as deadlines, essay questions, and so forth.
  • Keep a list of the scholarships you’re applying for.
  • Put a reminder of all the deadlines on your calendar, in a planner, or in your cell phone so that you don’t forget them.
10. Stay focused on your goals
  • It’s very easy to become overwhelmed by the application process. Set a timeline and stay focused on your goals.
Related Content

How to Apply

How to Apply

Applying at Oklahoma State University is as easy as 1 -2 -3 -4. There are four important steps in the application process for freshmen, and each one must be completed to begin your journey at OSU. Just remember: your application for admissions is also your application for scholarships.

Freshmen

1. Fill out the application
In order for us to process your application most quickly, we suggest you use the online application. You are always able to log back in to your account to finish if you are disrupted along the way. You can also print the application, fill it out and mail or deliver it to our office at

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

Once again, your application for admission is also your application for scholarships. While you are not required to complete the essay questions, we suggest you answer them to the best of your ability so that you will be considered for all applicable scholarship opportunities.

See our tips for answering essay questions.

2. Pay the application fee
The OSU application fee is $40 and non-refundable. It must be paid before your application can be processed. You may pay online with a VISA or Mastercard or pay by cash in person. You may also mail or deliver a check or money order made out to Oklahoma State University to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

Oklahoma State University accepts application fee waivers from ACT, SAT and NACAC. Have your high school guidance counselor forward your application fee waiver through email at admissions@okstate.edu. by fax at (405) 744-7092, or through the mail to the address listed above.

Oklahoma State University also accepts application fee waivers for students who demonstrate need by receiving free or reduced lunch costs. Your high school guidance counselor should send a letter that states that you receive free or reduced lunches by email at admissions@okstate.edu. by fax (405) 744-7092, or through the mail at the address listed above.

3. Submit your official transcript
Have your high school send Oklahoma State University your official transcript. Click here for more information on submitting official documents.

4. Send us your test scores
Send Oklahoma State University your official scores from ACT and SAT when you take the test by including OSU's official code of 3424 for ACT and 6546 for SAT. We also accept test scores reported on your official high school transcript. Click here for more information on submitting official documents.

You can also submit your scores online from ACT and SAT .

It's never too early to submit your official test scores. Continue to send OSU your scores as you retake the ACT and/or the SAT. Oklahoma State University will award tuition waivers and scholarships based on the best score we have on file until July 1.

Transfer Students

There are three important steps in the application process for transfer students and each one must be completed to begin your journey at OSU. Just remember, your application for admission is also your application for scholarships.

1. Fill Out the Application
In order for us to process your application most quickly, we suggest that you complete the online application . You are always able to log back into your account and finish if you are disrupted along the way. You can also print the application. fill it out and deliver it to our office or mail it to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

Once again, your application for admission is also your application for scholarships.

2. Pay the Application Fee
The OSU application fee is $40 and non-refundable. It must be paid before your application can be processed. You may pay online with a VISA or Mastercard or pay by cash in person. You may also mail or deliver a check or money order made out to Oklahoma State University to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

Oklahoma State University also accepts application fee waivers for students based on demonstrated need. These waivers are approved based on the information provided on your FAFSA, so please complete your FAFSA before completing a fee waiver form.

3. Submit Your Official Transcript
Submit an official transcript from each college or university you have attended. If you have less than 24 college-level credit hours, you will need to provide an official high school transcript containing your class rank (if available), grade-point average and graduation date. If your ACT and/or SAT scores are not on your high school transcript, you will need to provide an official copy of your ACT and/or SAT scores.

Click here for more information on submitting official documents.

Concurrent Students

Concurrent students must be enrolled as high school juniors or seniors. A complete application file for first-time concurrent students includes all information listed below. Continuing concurrent students must submit an updated Concurrent Applicant Form which is the last page of the Concurrent Application for Admission for each semester they plan to study concurrently at OSU. Concurrent students only have to pay the application fee once.

1. Fill out the application
In order to apply for concurrent status, you should print the concurrent application . fill it out and mail it or deliver it to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

2. Pay the application fee

The OSU application fee is $40 and non-refundable. It must be paid before your application can be processed. You may pay online with a VISA or Mastercard or pay by cash in person. You may also mail or deliver a check or money order made out to Oklahoma State University to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

Oklahoma State University accepts application fee waivers from ACT, SAT and NACAC. You can have your high school guidance counselor forward your application fee waiver through email at admissions@okstate.edu. by fax at (405) 744-7092, or through the mail to the address listed above.

Oklahoma State University also accepts application fee waivers to students based on demonstrated need (for example: a student on free or reduced lunch programs). Your high school guidance counselor should send a letter that explains the demonstrated need through email at admissions@okstate.edu. by fax (405) 744-7092, or through the mail at the address listed above.

3. Submit your official transcript

Have your high school send Oklahoma State University your official transcript. Click here for more information on submitting official documents.

4. Send us your test scores

Send Oklahoma State University your official scores from ACT and SAT when you take the test by including OSU's official code of 3424 for ACT and 6546 for SAT. We also accept test scores reported on your official high school transcript. Click here for more information on submitting official documents.

You can also submit your scores online from ACT and SAT .

Readmission Students

A readmission student is defined as a student who has attended OSU but was not enrolled during the immediate past semester (except the summer session). Readmission criteria are based on a student's status when he or she left OSU.

1. Complete an updated application
In order for us to process your application most quickly, we suggest that you complete the online application . You are always able to log back into your account and finish if you are disrupted along the way. You should complete all application questions, including the essay questions. Failure to do so will delay processing time. See our tips for answering the application essay questions.

You can also print the application. fill it out and deliver it to our office or mail it to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

2. Pay the application fee

The OSU application fee is $40 and non-refundable. It must be paid before your application can be processed. You may pay online with a VISA or Mastercard or pay by cash in person. You may also mail or deliver a check or money order made out to Oklahoma State University to:

Undergraduate Admissions
219 Student Union
Stillwater, OK 74078

Oklahoma State University also accepts application fee waivers for students based on demonstrated need. You can request an application fee waiver from our office. These waivers are approved based on the information provided on your FAFSA, therefore, the FAFSA should be completed before requesting a fee waiver form.

3. Submit your official transcripts
Submit an official transcript from each college or university you have attended since last attending OSU. Click here for more information on submitting official documents.

4. Submit a readmission petition
A student who left the university on probation or suspension may be required to submit a readmission petition and undergo the readmission appeal process. This process includes a review of the student's academic record and readmission petition. To determine whether or not a student is required to complete a petition, review the following chart .

International Students

1. Identify your applying category

You are considered as a FRESHMAN if:

  • You have earned no more than the equivalent of 24 credit hours of college-level credit after graduation from high school (Higher Secondary).

You are considered a TRANSFER if:

  • You have earned the equivalent of 24 or more credit hours of college-level credit from an accredited U.S. college or university or a recognized post secondary level institution located outside of the U.S. after graduation from high school (Higher Secondary).
  • You have attended OSU, but were not enrolled during the immediate past semester (summer session is not included in this definition).

You area considered as a NON-DEGREE SEEKING student if:

  • Want to be enrolled in OSU courses but are not pursuing a degree at OSU
  • You have graduated high school and wish to enroll in courses without pursuing a degree

For Graduate admission please apply through the OSU Graduate College .

For English Language Training only, please apply through English Language Institute (ELI).

2. Complete the online application
Complete the online application using your Full Name that exactly matches your passport. You are always able to log back in to your account to finish if you are disrupted along the way.

Your application for admission is also your application for scholarships. While you are not required to complete the essay questions, we suggest you answer them to the best of your ability so that you will be considered for all applicable scholarship opportunities.

See our tips for answering essay questions.

2. Pay the application fee
The OSU international application fee is $90 and non-refundable. It must be paid before your application can be processed. You may pay online with a VISA or Mastercard.

3. Send us a copy of your Passport Bio page
Submit a copy of your passport bio page as a part of your online application. You may also send it by email to admissions@okstate.edu or mail at

219 Student Union

Stillwater, OK 74078

4. Send us your English proficiency test scores (PBT/IBT TOEFL or IELTS)

There are a few different ways you can submit test scores to OSU. You may submit test scores as a part of your online application. Test scores can be sent to OSU directly from the testing agency. You may also send them by email to admissions@okstate.edu or mail at

219 Student Union

Stillwater, OK 74078

In certain cases, the language proficiency requirement can be waived.Click herefor more information on submitting official documents.

5. Send us your transcripts
Submit your high school transcript with a 3.0 GPA and above. Submit a college transcript from each institution attended (if you have earned college-level credit). Transcripts must be submitted in original language and translated to English.

There are a few different ways you can submit your transcripts to OSU. You may submit them as a part of your online application. Click here for other ways you may submit official transcripts. You may also send them by email to admissions@okstate.edu or mail at

219 Student Union

Stillwater, OK 74078

6. Send us your financial support documentation

Submit a copy of your financial support documentation as a part of your online application. You may also send it by email to admissions@okstate.edu or mail at

219 Student Union

Stillwater, OK 74078

International students may submit unofficial documents for admission consideration, students must provide an original copy of all documents prior to enrollment.