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Статья - Employment Skills Essay Research Paper Employment SkillsIntroductionIn - Иностранный язык

Employment Skills Essay, Research Paper

Employment SkillsIntroductionIn my essay I will talk about the skills required to get a goodjob nowadays. There will be three main points I will be discussingsuch as academic, personal management, and teamwork skills. Iwill give you examples of these skills, and reasons why this skill isimportant for you to get a job. Academic SkillsAcademic skills are probably the most important skill youwill need to get a job. It is one of the or the first thing an employerlooks for in an employee. They are skills which give you the basicfoundation to acquire, hold on to, and advance in a job, and toachieve the best results. Academic skills can be further divided into threesub-groups; communication, thinking, and learning skills. Communicate. Communication skills require you to understand andspeak the languages in which business is conducted. You must be a goodlistener, and be able to understand things easily. One of the most importantcommunicating skills would be reading, you should be able to comprehendand use written materials including things such as graphs, charts, anddisplays. One of the newest things we can add to communicating skillswould be the Internet, since it is so widely used all around the world – youshould have a good understanding of what it is and how to use it. Think. Thinking critically and acting logically to evaluate situationswill get you far in your job. Thinking skills consists of things such as solvingmathematical problems, using new technology, instruments, tools, andinformation systems effectively. Some examples of these would betechnology, physical science, the arts, skilled trades, social science, and muchmore. Learn. Learning is very important for any job. For example, if yourcompany, gets some new software, you must be able to learn how to use it,quickly and effectively after a few tutorials. You must continue doing this forthe rest of your career. It is one thing that will always be useful in anysituation, not just jobs. Personal Management Skills

Personal management skills is the combination of attitudes, skills, andbehaviors required to get, keep, and progress on a job and to achieve thebest results. Personal management skills can be further divided into threesub-groups just as academic skills, which are positive attitudes andbehaviors, responsibility, and adaptability. Positive Attitudes And Behaviors. This is also very important to keepa job. You must have good self-esteem and confidence in yourself. Youmust be honest, have integrity, and personal ethnics. You must show youremployer you are happy at what you are doing and have positive attitudestoward learning, growth, and personal health. Show energy, and persistenceto get the job done, these can help you to get promoted or a raise. Responsibility. Responsibility is the ability to set goals and prioritiesin work an personal life. It is the ability to plan an manage time, money, andother resources to achieve goals, and accountability for actions taken. Adaptability. Have a positive attitude toward changes in your job. Recognition of an respect for people’s diversity and individual differences. Creativity is also important. You must have the ability to identify and suggestnew ideas to get the job done. Teamwork SkillsTeamwork skills are those skills needed to work with others co-operatively on a job and to achieve the best results. You should show youremployer you able to work with others, understand and contribute to theorganization’s goals. Involve yourself in the group, make good decisionswith others and support the outcomes. Don’t be narrow minded, listen towhat others have to say and give your thoughts towards their comments. Be aleader not a loner in the group. ConclusionIn conclusion I would like to say that all these skills I have discussedare critical to get, keep, and progress in a job and to achieve the best resultspossible for you. Of these skills though academic skills would be the mostimportant skills you will learn, I think. So if you keep at these skills you willbe happy with what you are doing unlike a lot of people who are forced toget jobs that they do not like.

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Technology and Adult Learning: Current Perspectives

Technology and Adult Learning: Current Perspectives


Throughout the 20th century, changes in technology have had social and economic ramifications. Although each successive wave of technological innovation has created changes to which adults have had to adjust, "what perhaps differentiates earlier technological changes from today’s is the current emphasis on educational applications" (Merriam and Brockett 1997, p. 113). The most pervasive of the technologies with educational applications are the Internet and World Wide Web, but other technologies can also be used to facilitate adult learning. In considering the role of technology in adult learning, adult educators are faced with a number of challenges, including how to respond to technology and how to exploit it without diminishing the learning experience (Field 1997). The purpose of this Digest is to review some current perspectives about technology and adult learning. It begins by describing approaches for integrating technology into adult learning and then considers how technology can be used to support and expand adult learning.

Integrating Technology into Adult Learning

Ginsburg (1998) presents a helpful way to think about integrating technology into adult learning by proposing four basic approaches: technology as curriculum, delivery mechanism, complement to instruction, and instructional tool. Each approach is summarized here, including its benefits and limitations.

Technology as Curriculum

Not only can adults learn content through technology, they can also learn about technology itself (Merriam ad Brockett 1997) and develop the skills to use it competently. An example of the technology as curriculum approach is the course, "Exploring the Internet." Offered by the Georgia Center for Continuing Education, the 10-hour, noncredit evening course is designed to provide adults with the concepts and skills for using Internet applications such as e-mail and the Web (Cahoon 1998). The benefits of this approach include the opportunity to address each aspect of the technology in a clear, structured manner; little or no distraction from peripheral learning issues or goals beyond those of learning the technology; and efficiency in acquiring a discrete set of technology skills that can be applied in different settings. The major limitation of the approach is the narrow focus on the technology and the skills to use it. When technology skills are acquired in an isolated environment, they may not be easily transferred and applied by the learner in meaningful ways. In addition, if the learner lacks an opportunity for practice, the skills may deteriorate (Ginsburg 1998).

Technology as a Delivery Mechanism

A second approach for integrating technology into adult learning is to use it as means for instructional delivery. In basic skills instruction, an example of this approach is the individualized learning system (ILS). ILSs are designed to provide instruction and practice in a set of subskills that together form an entire curriculum. Other examples include televised instruction and instruction delivered through video or audiotapes. Although this approach lends itself to individualizing instruction, for the most part, the learner works in isolation from other learners and, in some instances, the teacher. Also, few, if any, technology skills are acquired. For example, ILSs require learners only to retrieve the software program, identify themselves, and employ a limited number of keystrokes. They are also costly (ibid.), a limitation that does not extend to televisions, VCRs, and audiotape players, which are more readily available.

Technology as a Complement to Instruction

In adult learning settings, technology is frequently used to complement instruction and extend learning. In adult basic education, for example, a learner might use a piece of software to practice a weak or underdeveloped skill area that has been the focus of classroom instruction (ibid). Another example of this approach is the use of Internet activities and assignments to supplement traditional distance learning (for example, telephone-supported correspondence study) (Eastmond 1998). In this approach, the instructor remains the primary coordinator of instruction and the extent to which technology is integrated with traditional instruction depends upon both the teacher’s style and the kind and type of technology available. Use of technology to complement instruction extends the instruction beyond the knowledge and experiences of the teacher and can also provide opportunities for the teacher to learn. The approach also provides learners the opportunity to practice skills in private, and it can promote self-direction by allowing learners to supplement instruction in ways that meet their individual needs (Eastmond 1998; Ginsburg 1998).

A major limitation of this approach is the kind and type of material available that is suitable for adults and that promotes good adult learning practices. In the case of software, for example, teachers must take time to locate, review, and select software packages. Also, drill and practice, which does not involve the development of high-level cognitive skills such as problem solving, is the focus of many software programs. The cost of acquiring the most suitable software may also be a limitation. Finally, to avoid technology simply becoming an "add-on," teachers need to ensure that the use of technology is congruent with the primary instruction (Ginsburg 1998).

Technology as an Instructional Tool

When technology is used as an instructional tool, it is integrated into instructional activities. The primary instructional goals and outcomes remain the same, but technology is used to enrich and extend them. Although acquiring technology-related skills is not the primary focus in this approach, instructional activities frequently support their development. In completing writing assignments, for example, learners develop skills in word processing (ibid). The spread of the Internet and the World Wide Web has made this approach very common in distance education and in other education and training settings. Distance education delivered via computer conferencing is one example (Eastmond 1998). Technology has also been used to extend adult literacy curricula in a multilevel classroom by enabling learners to have immediate access to Internet-based resources that provide content of interest to their life situations and allow for teaching of skills in context (Cowles 1997). This approach allows learners to develop skills and have experiences with technology in ways that will benefit them outside the instructional setting.

When compared to the first approach, technology as curriculum, learners may more readily transfer the technology skills learned to other settings. When used as an instructional tool, the Internet provides access to information and resources that might not ordinarily be available (Ginsburg 1998). As will be discussed more fully in the next section, this approach can also be used to broaden and enhance adult learning experiences. A limitation of this approach is the willingness of instructors to adapt or develop instructional activities. In adult basic education, a shortage of curricular resources that integrate and benefit from technology exists. Access to technology for either educational providers or learners can also be a problem. Finally, an instructor’s understanding and ability to use the technology may also be a limitation (ibid).

The four approaches presented here are all currently used for adult learning, and they are helpful in thinking about how to integrate technology into adult learning. How technology can be structured to capitalize on the characteristics of adult learners must be considered as well.

Supporting and Extending Adult Learning through Technology

Like any other instructional tool, technology can serve to perpetuate poor educational practice or it can become a means for transforming learning. In formal learning settings, leadership for using technoogy effectively rests with the instructor. However, "[technologies] are not neutral tools. Their use will reflect whatever values the educator holds—consciously or subconsciously—about her/his relationship with learners, and their use will invariably bring advantages and disadvantages" (Burge and Roberts 1993, p. 35).

Technology can enhance adult learning because it has the potential to increase flexibility, provide access to expertise, facilitate discussion among learners who cannot meet face to face, reduce feelings of isolation often experienced by nontraditional learners, increase learner autonomy, and support and promote constructivist and collaborative learning (Burge 1994; Cahoon 1998; Eastmond 1998; Field 1997). However, because "technology in and of itself does not promote learning" (Burge and Roberts 1993, p. 35), its use does not obviate the educator’s responsibility for structuring the learning to ensure these benefits result.

Part of using technology effectively is understanding what adults want in the learning environment when technology is employed. Suggestions for structuring environments include the following (adapted from Burge and Carter 1997, pp. 5-6):

·Create a place where learners can collect important ideas, express themselves, and feel some security that they are going in the right direction.

·Provide fast and productive access to help when it is needed.

·Because adults generally have two basic intrinsic motivating drives of autonomy and affiliation, provide a learning environment that promotes both independent and interdependent activities with cognitive as well as psychosocial support.

·Because adults value economy of effort (i.e. they don’t want to waste time), ensure that the learning tools are intuitive and essential for the immediate task.

The literature contains a number of examples of how technology is being used to promote and extend good practice in adult learning. Cowles (1997) uses the Internet to support her beliefs that skills are learned best when imbedded in context of interest to the learner and when learning is active. She has found the Internet to be a tool that can be used to individualize instruction but at the same time keep it in the context of the group and program goals. Pobega (1996) describes how he was able to use the Internet to involve students more directly in producing a student newspaper that he had edited for 5 years with the goal of developing their literacy skills. Work on the newspaper resulted in students developing writing skills, engaging with technology, and working collaboratively as an editorial team. Technology enabled Pennsylvania practitioners to overcome two issues in professional development: isolation and the effective use of practice-based professional development (Strunk and Fowler-Frey 1996). The Internet allowed 10 adult basic education practitioners engaged in action research projects to form a research community that provided not only support and encouragement but also led to critical reflection on their practice. As reported by Eastmond (1998), studies of adult learning through online instruction found that learners engaged in knowledge construction, collaborative learning, reflection, and interactivity. However, as Eastmond points out, none of "these elements are inherent in the technology but must be fostered by the course design, instructor engagement, and student behavior" (p. 37).

Adult educators may once have been able to ignore the educational applications of technology, but that is no longer the case. The tools that can support and advance the goals of adult learning are a part of everyday life and are used by millions of adults on a daily basis. Unless adult educators become proactive in developing opportunities that will provide advantages for adult learners, they may end up watching the exploitation of technologies from the sidelines (Field 1997). Their primary role should be to ensure that the focus is on the learning and not the technology. "The spotlight should first fall on the conditions, dynamics and outcomes of learner activity, in ways that promote learner self-esteem and their competence as proactive learners" (Burge and Roberts 1993, p. 37).

Burge, E. "Electronic Highway or Weaving Loom? Thinking about Conferencing Technologies for Learning." 1994. (ED 377 814)

Burge, E. J. and Carter, N. M. "It’s Building, But Is It Designing? Constructing Internet-Based Learning Environments." Paper presented at the 18th World Conference of the International Council for Distance Education, University Park, PA, June 2-6, 1997. (ED 412 333)

Burge, E. J. and Roberts, J. M. Classrooms with a Difference: A Practical Guide to the Use of Conferencing Technologies. Toronto: Distance Learning Office, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 1993. (ED 364 206)

Cahoon, B. "Teaching and Learning Internet Skills." In Adult Learning and the Internet, edited by B. Cahoon, pp. 5-13. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, no. 78. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998.

Cowles, S. K. "Technology Melts Classroom Walls." Focus on Basics 1, issue C (September 1997): 11-13.

Eastmond, D. V. "Adult Learners and Internet-Based Distance Education." In Adult Learning and the Internet, edited by B. Cahoon, pp. 33-41. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, no. 78. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998.

Field, J. "Passive or Proactive?" Adults Learning 8, no. 6 (February 1997): 160-161.

Ginsburg, L. "Integrating Technology into Adult Learning." In Technology, Basic Skills, and Adult Education: Getting Ready and Moving Forward, Information Series no. 372, edited by C. Hopey, pp. 37-45. Columbus: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, Center on Education and Training for Employment, College of Education, The Ohio State University, 1998.

Merriam, S. and Brockett, R. The Profession and Practice of Adult Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.

Pobega, D. "The Story of @LBE-ELECTRONIC: Adult Literacy Students Publish on the Net." Literacy Now 1 (September-October 1996: 6-7; 16-18. (ED 401 385)

Strunk, S. J. and Fowler-Frey, J. ESL Online Action Research. Final Report. Lancaster: Pennsylvania Association for Adult Continuing Education; Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit, 1996. (ED 406 861)

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Ontario Learning Skills - Ontario Report Card Comments And Learning Skills Generator

 Report Card Learning Skills

The Ontario report card learning skills section is designed to outline the 6 main learning skills that students need to achieve in school, and later in life. The learning skills follow under the following headings:
The following are sample behaviours which are designed to help identify strengths and support growth of those learning skills and work habits.

Responsibility
· fulfills commitments in learning environments;
· completes and submits class work, homework, and assignments according to agreed upon timelines; and manages his/her behaviour.

Independent Work
· monitors, assesses, and revises plans to complete tasks and meet goals;
· uses class time appropriately to complete tasks;
· and follows instructions with minimal supervision.

Collaboration
· accepts various roles and an equitable share of the work within a group;
· responds positively to the ideas, opinions, values, and traditions of others;
· builds healthy peer relationships;
· works with others to resolves conflicts and builds consensus to achieve group goals;
· and shares information, resources, and expertise to solve problems and make decisions.

Organization
· creates and follows a plan to complete work and tasks;
· establishes priorities and manages time to achieve goals; and
· gathers, evaluates and uses information, technology and resources to complete tasks.

Initiative
· acts upon new ideas and opportunities for learning;
· demonstrates a willingness to take risks;
· demonstrates curiosity and interest in learning;
· approaches new tasks with a positive attitude;
· and recognizes and advocates appropriately for the rights of self and others.

Self-Regulation
· sets his/her individual goals and monitors progress towards achieving them;
· seeks assistance when needed;
· assesses and reflects critically on her/his strengths, needs and interests;
· identifies learning opportunities, choices, and strategies to meet personal needs and achieve goals;
· and perseveres when facing challenges.

Adapted From:
Growing Success: Assessment,
Evaluation and Reporting in
Ontario Schools (Grades 1-12)
is available at The Ontario
Ministry of website at:
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

A Recipe for Great Report Card Comments

What kind of information must report card comments contain? How should this information be presented? When they need to start writing their report cards, teachers may feel a bit overwhelmed by the important work load they have to face, as well as the complex nature of these reports.

There is a recipe for writing great report card comments, and it is easy to apply. Using a comment bank generator is the easiest way for teachers to get rid of a lot of headache, while obtaining great results in the process.

It can be very tedious and even complicated to find the right words to describe each student’s behaviour in class, especially when you have to write a report for each of the over 20 students in your class. However, with the help of a report card comment bank, this job can become very easy..

Here is how these comments generators work. First, the teacher needs to introduce some information on the student’s profile, including age and gender. Then, the teacher will have to give accurate answers regarding certain learning skills for each student. Good generators do not only create report card comments for each student, but they also allow the teacher to introduce some personal notes in the beginning or the end of the report.

Report cards need to be written in a positive manner, and this is something made easy by a report card comment bank. The parents do not have to feel shamed by their kids’ evolution in school. The ultimate role of these report card comments is to explain to parents where their kids excel and where they need help. As actively involved contributors to their kids’ education, parents can offer their help in improving their children’s performance in school.

Teachers can also offer great suggestions in regards to how students may benefit from setting up certain goals. A report card has to leave plenty of room for improvement, and suggest how this improvement can be obtained.

Student Evaluator is a comment bank generator, created according to Ontario learning skills principles, and its role is to help teachers complete their reports clearly and accurately, without wasting their time. Any Ontario teacher can appeal to this tool in order to complete his or her card comments in a simple and efficient manner. Also, the principles used by Student Evaluator can be used by teachers from all over the world, as they serve for evaluating students’ behaviour and knowledge in a general manner.

Learning Skills - Ontario Provincial Report Card - Vera

One thing I found particularly challenging as I worked through progress reports this weekend was arriving at a "mark" that accurately reflects student progress in the six different learning skills on page one of the report.

Organization, Independent Work, Collaboration, Responsibility, Initiative and Self-Regulation all have to be judged as "N-needs improvement", "S-satisfactory", "G-good" or "E-excellent" for every student. At only 7 weeks into the school year. One thing some of my colleagues and I have been working on is making the descriptors from the report card more "student friendly", in terms of language, in order that we might communicate the look-fors more effectively to students.

Below are two examples, Independent Work and Collaboration. which we use with students as we are developing criteria by which they can self-assess. These criteria are posted in the room and referred to throughout the year. They also form the basis for a Learning Skill-specific activity we complete together as we discuss each Skill.

As we work with students throughout each day, many behaviours are observed that form the basis for anecdotal records. But where to record these? Until now, I have used a variety of recording locations and tools. Working on progress reports this past weekend reminded me of the importance of having notes in one place, linked specifically to the learning skills as a whole, since we report on them as a group. One of my colleagues sent me a draft of a template he had been working on, with multiple LS on one page. This inspired me to create my own tool for use with LS.

Below is a tracking sheet I am going to try out for Term One reports. The descriptors are copied almost verbatim from the report card, with some fine-tuning (so they make more sense "at a glance"!) As I move about my classroom taking note of the things students say or do that may link to a specific learning skill, I can jot these down in my binder, or even on a sticky note which I can then transfer to the appropriate spot on the record sheet. Later, the anecdotals can be used to construct comments for the report card.

I am hopeful that this organizational tool will make accurate, descriptive comments more effective and efficent come January!

Employment Skills Essay Research Paper Employment SkillsIntroductionIn

Employment Skills Essay Research Paper Employment SkillsIntroductionIn

Employment Skills Essay, Research Paper

Employment SkillsIntroductionIn my essay I will talk about the skills required to get a goodjob nowadays. There will be three main points I will be discussingsuch as academic, personal management, and teamwork skills. Iwill give you examples of these skills, and reasons why this skill isimportant for you to get a job. Academic SkillsAcademic skills are probably the most important skill youwill need to get a job. It is one of the or the first thing an employerlooks for in an employee. They are skills which give you the basicfoundation to acquire, hold on to, and advance in a job, and toachieve the best results. Academic skills can be further divided into threesub-groups; communication, thinking, and learning skills. Communicate. Communication skills require you to understand andspeak the languages in which business is conducted. You must be a goodlistener, and be able to understand things easily. One of the most importantcommunicating skills would be reading, you should be able to comprehendand use written materials including things such as graphs, charts, anddisplays. One of the newest things we can add to communicating skillswould be the Internet, since it is so widely used all around the world – youshould have a good understanding of what it is and how to use it. Think. Thinking critically and acting logically to evaluate situationswill get you far in your job. Thinking skills consists of things such as solvingmathematical problems, using new technology, instruments, tools, andinformation systems effectively. Some examples of these would betechnology, physical science, the arts, skilled trades, social science, and muchmore. Learn. Learning is very important for any job. For example, if yourcompany, gets some new software, you must be able to learn how to use it,quickly and effectively after a few tutorials. You must continue doing this forthe rest of your career. It is one thing that will always be useful in anysituation, not just jobs. Personal Management Skills

Personal management skills is

the combination of attitudes, skills, andbehaviors required to get, keep, and progress on a job and to achieve thebest results. Personal management skills can be further divided into threesub-groups just as academic skills, which are positive attitudes andbehaviors, responsibility, and adaptability. Positive Attitudes And Behaviors. This is also very important to keepa job. You must have good self-esteem and confidence in yourself. Youmust be honest, have integrity, and personal ethnics. You must show youremployer you are happy at what you are doing and have positive attitudestoward learning, growth, and personal health. Show energy, and persistenceto get the job done, these can help you to get promoted or a raise. Responsibility. Responsibility is the ability to set goals and prioritiesin work an personal life. It is the ability to plan an manage time, money, andother resources to achieve goals, and accountability for actions taken. Adaptability. Have a positive attitude toward changes in your job. Recognition of an respect for people’s diversity and individual differences. Creativity is also important. You must have the ability to identify and suggestnew ideas to get the job done. Teamwork SkillsTeamwork skills are those skills needed to work with others co-operatively on a job and to achieve the best results. You should show youremployer you able to work with others, understand and contribute to theorganization’s goals. Involve yourself in the group, make good decisionswith others and support the outcomes. Don’t be narrow minded, listen towhat others have to say and give your thoughts towards their comments. Be aleader not a loner in the group. ConclusionIn conclusion I would like to say that all these skills I have discussedare critical to get, keep, and progress in a job and to achieve the best resultspossible for you. Of these skills though academic skills would be the mostimportant skills you will learn, I think. So if you keep at these skills you willbe happy with what you are doing unlike a lot of people who are forced toget jobs that they do not like.

Ontario Welcomes You

Welcome to Ontario Settlement Services

As a newcomer to Ontario, you may have questions getting settled in your new home. Ontario Immigration has many services and programs to help you find the information and help you need. Any time you need more help, you can also ask an expert .

Find a Home

Discover Ontario’s communities in our Cities and Towns section. It includes links to community websites that offer help to newcomers.

Learn about housing in Ontario or, for detailed information on buying or renting a home, including what you can expect to pay, home insurance, your rights and responsibilities as a tenant, and options for short-term accommodation, visit the Housing section at Settlement.org - our partner website hosted by the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants .

Human Rights in Ontario

Know your human rights in Ontario, and learn about your responsibilities. Discover more about the history of human rights in Ontario and the creation of the Ontario Human Rights Commission .

Find Employment

Many newcomers to Ontario find that looking for a job can be a full-time job in itself. There are many places that can help you find work. learn about what to expect in your industry or learn about current Ontario labour market information .

You should also know which professions require a licence in Ontario, and how to have your academic background assessed to work in your profession. Internationally trained and educated individuals can find out how to qualify for professional practice in Ontario at Global Experience Ontario .

If you want to work temporarily in Ontario, read Working in Ontario with a work permit to find out how to apply.

Niagara Falls is known as the “Honeymoon Capital of the World .” Every couple receives an official honeymoon certificate signed by the Mayor of Niagara Falls.

Find Social Services Find a School

Everything you need to know about learning in Ontario :

  • Find information on day care or sending your children to school .
  • Discover Ontario’s colleges and universities .
  • Learn about studying in Ontario as an international student .
  • Find ways of upgrading your skills, completing high school or furthering your education as an adult learner .
Canadian Citizenship Find Language Classes

English and French are the two official languages of Canada. If you need to improve your language skills. Ontario offers many resources that can help you, either before you arrive or after you’ve settled in your new home. Programs and services tailored for children are also available. Once you’ve arrived, you can locate language classes offered across the province by using this online tool .

The bright colours of the fall, or autumn, make this one of Ontario’s favourite seasons for driving the Ontario countryside. Winston Churchill once described the Niagara River Parkway as “the prettiest Sunday afternoon drive in the world.” Find out why. You can also download your own PDF copy of Great Fall Drives 2008 .

Canada’s oldest farmers’ market is located behind Kingston’s 160-year-old City Hall. which overlooks the city’s harbour. The square turns into a skating rink during winter.

The ontario language curriculum

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Ontario Virtual School

Assessment & Evaluation Policy Overview

The Assessment and Evaluation Policy for Ontario Virtual School is consistent with Ministry policy and reflects the vision that Ontario Virtual School has which is that the primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning. Assessment is the process of gathering information that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a subject or course. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as both “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning”. As part of assessment for learning, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback and coaching for improvement. Teachers engage in assessment as learning by helping all students develop their capacity to be independent, autonomous learners who are able to set individual goals, monitor their own progress, determine next steps, and reflect on their thinking and learning. Ongoing per-assessments and formative assessments will be used to provide meaningful feedback about student progress and achievement in order to improve performance. Summative assessments will be used to arrive at the grade.

Course evaluation will be divided into two parts:

70% is based on cumulative evidence of summative evaluations undertaken throughout the semester; -30% is based on final evaluations which will take place in the final third of the course. Final evaluations may or may not include an exam depending on individual course curriculum policy documents. At the beginning of the course, students will receive course outlines that will include detailed assessment and evaluation information, and that also outline the percentage breakdown for both the 70% and the 30%. All courses will be evaluated according to the following breakdown:

– Knowledge and Understanding

Although each course will have the same breakdown, individual courses may have subject specific summative tasks that will be used to determine the student’s grade. Please refer to the course outline as it is presented in your courses for more details.

Second Chance Protocol

Based on the premise that the primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning, students will be given additional opportunities to demonstrate their learning if they are not successful on their first attempt. It will be at the teacher’s discretion and professional opinion on when to exercise this option.

Withdrawing From a Course
  • Withdrawals occurring within 5 days of the issuing of the first report card from the Ontario Virtual School (OVS) will result in the mark not being recorded on the OST.
  • a withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the first report card results in a “W” being entered in the “Credit” column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal.
  • Withdrawals at anytime from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST
  • If there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student’s withdrawal from a course, an “S” may be entered in the “Note” column on the OST.
Repetition of a Course
  • Only one credit is earned if course is repeated
  • In Grade 11 and 12, an “R” appears on the student’s OST for the course with the lower mark
Requesting Course Changing

Course transfer policy: A student who registers and is enrolled into a course for less than a month and does not complete an assessment in the course, may request to be transferred to another course. Students will only be granted one course transfer per enrollment. All course transfer requests must come within a month of the initial enrollment. The decision of the OVS Principal will be considered final in all cases involving student requests for course transfers.

Reporting Student Achievement

Ontario Virtual School will use the Provincial Report Card, Grades 9-12, for formal written reports sent home two times over the duration the student is active in the course. The first report reflects student achievement of the overall curriculum expectations during the first reporting period, as well as development of the learning skills and work habits. The final report reflects achievement of the overall expectations for the entire course, as well as development of the learning skills and work habits.

Learning Skills

The following Learning Skills guideline will be used by online teachers when assessing students Learning Skills:

Learning Skills and Habits