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Saraca Indica Classification Essay

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Saraca indica classification essay

Saraca

The trees are grown in distinctly warm humid climates, and prefer a moist well-drained soil with plenty of organic matter. They can also be grown within greenhouses. The trees themselves are grown for their upturned flowers which have clusters in yellow, orange or red. The trees' flowers have no petals, but contain brightly colored sepals, and have stamens projecting up to eight inches long. The leaves are pinnate and have paired leaflets. Typically, these trees are accustomed to the shade of other trees. Most species of Saraca are trees characteristic of particular streams. The species Saraca asoca is believed to be the tree under which Buddha was born. Red saraca is the provincial tree of Yala province. Thailand .

Pests

S. indica is host to the Peacock mite Tuckerella channabasavannai .

References
  • De Wilde, W. J. J. O. (1985). Saraca tubiflora. A New Species from West-central Sumatra (Caesalpinioideae). Blumea30. 425-428.
  • Hooker, Joseph Dalton. (1879). The Flora of British India. Vol II. London: L. Reeve & Co.
  • Mabberley, D. J. (1987). The Plant Book: A Portable Dictionary of the Higher Plants. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-34060-8 .
  • Blaxell, D. Bryant, G. Francis, F. Greig, D. Guest, S. Moore, J. North, T. Paddison, V. Roberts, S. Rodd, T. Scholer, P. Segall, B. Stowar, J. Walsh, K. (2001) "The Firefly Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs." Willowdale, Ontario: Firefly Books Ltd. ISBN 1-55209-603-3 .

Other articles

Saraca indica classification essay

Saraca Look at other dictionaries:

Saraca — indica Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae … Wikipedia

Saraca — (S. Burm.), gehört zu Jonesia Roxb. aus der Pflanzenfamilie der Papilionaceae Caesalpinieae … Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

saraça — s. f. 1. Tecido fino de algodão. • s. m. 2. [Portugal: Trás os Montes] Homem trapalhão. • saraças s. f. pl. 3. [Portugal: Trás os Montes] Filtros amorosos; amavios, mezinha … Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

SARACA — I. SARACA apud Anastasium in Benedicto III. Saraca de olovero cum chrysoclavo, camisias abbas sigillatas holosericas. Item Sarica, genur tunicae est, cuius mentio, in veteri Instrumento plenariae securitatis, quod exstat MS. in ligni cortice, in… … Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

Saracá — Sp Sarakà Ap Saracá L ež. Brazilijoje (Amazonės v ja) … Pasaulio vietovardžiai. Internetinė duomenų bazė

¡saraca! — lunf. Igual que ¡Araca! … Diccionario Lunfardo

Saraca — bestemmia … Mini Vocabolario milanese italiano

Saraca celebica — Conservation status Near Threatened (IUCN 2.3) Scientific classification … Wikipedia

Saraca thaipingensis — Flowers Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae … Wikipedia

Saraca (moth) — Saraca Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta … Wikipedia

Saraca declinata — Red Saraca Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae (unranked) … Wikipedia

Saraca indica L

Saraca indica L.

Larsen,K. et al (1980) In: Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Vietnam, Vol 18.A.

Larsen,K. et al. (1984) Flora of Thailand, Vol 4 Part 1.In: T.Smithinand & K.Larsen

Robertson,S.A. (1989) Flowering Plants of Seychelles. Kew

Roskov Yu.R. (2005) Editorial Scrutiny: Malesian data import (unpubl.)

Sanjappa,M. (1992) Legumes of India. Dehra Dun: Bishen Singh Mahendra.

Whitmore,T.C. (1972) Tree Flora of Malaya, Vol.1. London:Longman

Zuijderhoudt,G.F.P. (1968) Blumea 15:413-425. A revision of the genus Saraca

Citation and licensing Default citation

GBIF Secretariat: GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. doi:10.15468/39omei
Accessed via http://www.gbif.org/species/5359538 on 2016-08-07

Rights

Known issues

There are known issues with this name usage:

basionym relation derived

Source information

This backbone name usage is included because it was found in another checklist at the time the backbone was built.
View the primary source usage in Catalogue of Life.

Record history

This record was last modified on Apr 13, 2016.

Saraca indica classification essay

Saraca

The trees are grown in warm humid climates, and prefer a moist well-drained soil with plenty of organic matter. They can also be grown within greenhouses. The trees themselves are grown for their upturned flowers which have clusters in yellow, orange or red. The trees flowers have no petals, but contain brightly colored sepals, and have stamens projecting up to eight inches long. The leaves are pinnate and have paired leaflets. Typically, these trees are accustomed to the shade of other trees. Most species of Saraca are trees characteristic of particular streams. The species Saraca asoca is believed to be the tree under which Buddha was born. Red saraca is the provincial tree of Yala province. Thailand .

Pests

S. indica is host to the Peacock mite Tuckerella channabasavannai .

References
  • De Wilde, W. J. J. O. (1985). Saraca tubiflora. A New Species from West-central Sumatra (Caesalpinioideae). Blumea30. 425-428.
  • Hooker, Joseph Dalton. (1879). The Flora of British India. Vol II. London: L. Reeve & Co.
  • Mabberley, D. J. (1987). The Plant Book: A Portable Dictionary of the Higher Plants. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-34060-8 .
  • Blaxell, D. Bryant, G. Francis, F. Greig, D. Guest, S. Moore, J. North, T. Paddison, V. Roberts, S. Rodd, T. Scholer, P. Segall, B. Stowar, J. Walsh, K. (2001) "The Firefly Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs." Willowdale, Ontario: Firefly Books Ltd. ISBN 1-55209-603-3 .

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010 .

Look at other dictionaries:

Saraca — (S. Burm.), gehört zu Jonesia Roxb. aus der Pflanzenfamilie der Papilionaceae Caesalpinieae … Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

saraça — s. f. 1. Tecido fino de algodão. • s. m. 2. [Portugal: Trás os Montes] Homem trapalhão. • saraças s. f. pl. 3. [Portugal: Trás os Montes] Filtros amorosos; amavios, mezinha … Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

SARACA — I. SARACA apud Anastasium in Benedicto III. Saraca de olovero cum chrysoclavo, camisias abbas sigillatas holosericas. Item Sarica, genur tunicae est, cuius mentio, in veteri Instrumento plenariae securitatis, quod exstat MS. in ligni cortice, in… … Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

Saracá — Sp Sarakà Ap Saracá L ež. Brazilijoje (Amazonės v ja) … Pasaulio vietovardžiai. Internetinė duomenų bazė

¡saraca! — lunf. Igual que ¡Araca! … Diccionario Lunfardo

Saraca — bestemmia … Mini Vocabolario milanese italiano

Saraca celebica — Conservation status Near Threatened (IUCN 2.3) Scientific classification … Wikipedia

Saraca thaipingensis — Flowers Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae … Wikipedia

Saraca (moth) — Saraca Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta … Wikipedia

Saraca declinata — Red Saraca Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae (unranked) … Wikipedia

Saraca: Wikis (The Full Wiki)

Saraca: Wikis

The trees are grown in warm humid climates, and prefer a moist well-drained soil with plenty of organic matter. They can also be grown within greenhouses. The trees themselves are grown for their upturned flowers which have clusters in yellow, orange or red. The trees flowers have no petals, but contain brightly colored sepals, and have stamens projecting up to eight inches long. The leaves are pinnate and have paired leaflets. Typically, these trees are accustomed to the shade of other trees. Most species of Saraca are trees characteristic of particular streams. The species Saraca asoca is believed to be the tree under which Buddha was born. Red saraca is the provincial tree of Yala province. Thailand .

Pests

S. indica is host to the Peacock mite Tuckerella channabasavannai .

References
  • De Wilde, W. J. J. O. (1985). Saraca tubiflora. A New Species from West-central Sumatra (Caesalpinioideae). Blumea30. 425-428.
  • Hooker, Joseph Dalton. (1879). The Flora of British India. Vol II. London: L. Reeve & Co.
  • Mabberley, D. J. (1987). The Plant Book: A Portable Dictionary of the Higher Plants. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-34060-8.
  • Blaxell, D. Bryant, G. Francis, F. Greig, D. Guest, S. Moore, J. North, T. Paddison, V. Roberts, S. Rodd, T. Scholer, P. Segall, B. Stowar, J. Walsh, K. (2001) "The Firefly Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs." Willowdale, Ontario: Firefly Books Ltd. ISBN 1-55209-603-3.

Saraca indica, Ashoka Tree

The origin of the name Saraca indica is doubtful and it can hardly be claimed to be an improvement on the old one of Jonesia asoka, given by Indian botanists to honour Sir W. Jones " the most enlightened of the sons of men," who himself expressed the wish that the tree should retain the old Sanskrit name Ashoka.

Indigenous to India, Burma and Malaya, it is an erect tree, small and evergreen, with a smooth, grey-brown bark. The crown is compact and shapely.

Flowers are usually to be seen throughout the year, but it is in January and February that the profusion of orange and scarlet clusters turns the tree into an object of startling beauty. Pinned closely on to every branch and twig, these clusters consist of numerous, small, long-tubed flowers which open out into four oval lobes. Yellow when young, they become orange then crimson with age and from the effect of the sun's rays. From a ring at the top of each tube spread several long, half-white, half-crimson, stamens which give an hairy appearance to the flower clusters. In strong contrast to these fiery blooms is the deep-green, shiny foliage. The foot-long leaves each have four, five or six pairs of long, wavy-edged, leaflets. Young leaves are soft, red and limp and remain pendent even after attaining full size.

The straight or scimitar shaped pods, stiff, leathery, broad and about eight inches long, are red and fleshy before ripening.

As one would expect from a tree of the country it has many useful medicinal properties. The juice obtained from boiling the bark is a cure for some ailments of women, and a pulp of the blossoms is one of the remedies used for dysentery.
As it is believed that Sakyamuni, the founder of the Buddhist religion and doctrine of Nirvana was born under an Asok tree in the IX Century B.C. the tree is worshipped by all Buddhists. Hindus also revere it because to them it is the symbol of love and dedicated to Rama. Sita, wife of Rama, when abducted by the evil Ravanna was kept in a garden among groves of Asoka trees. Both Buddhists and Hindus plant the tree round their temples and the blossoms are among those used for religious offerings.
On Ashok Shasthi day, women from Bengal eat the flower buds, while Hindu ladies believe that by drinking the water in which flowers have lain, they will protect their children from worry and grief.

There is a quaint Indian belief that trees will only flower in places where a woman's foot has trod and another which asserts that a tree will bloom more vigorously if kicked by a young lady!

Medicinal herb Ashoka

Ayurveda medicinal herb - Ashoka

BOTANICAL NAME :SARACA INDICA. HINDI= ASHOK, SANSKRIT= ASHOKA

PART USED. Bark, Seeds and Flowers.

HISTORICAL ASPECTS :
In the Ramayana, one of the books of Hindu mythology, there is mention of Ashoka tree.
Ashoka means "without sorrow", a reference to this bark's reputation for keeping women healthy and youthful.
Buddha was said to be born under this tree.
HABITAT. Saraca Indica is grown all over India. It occur upto the altitudes 600 metres. It is cultivated in many gardens because of its decorative orange red flowers and evergreen beautiful foliage.
BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION. Leaves are narrowly lanceolate 15.25 cms long cork like at the base and with a short petiole.
Stipules are intra-petiolar and completely united. Flowers are fragrant. They are 7.5-10 cm across Calyx is yellow to orange and finally red. Its stamens are 7 to 8. The filaments are filiform.
The bark of saraca indica is distinguished by presence of wartyprotuberances on its outer surface.

BENEFITS OF ASHOKA. Its use in treatment of excessive uterine bleeding is extensive in India. The plant is used also in dysmenorrhoea and for depression in women.

ASHOKA HEALTH BENEFITS / USES. It is useful in menorrhagia (scant menses), dysmenorrhea (painful menses, menstrual cramps),
depression, bleeding hemorrhoids, uterine fibroid,considered a uterine sedative and tonic. Useful in Leucorrhoea.

PHYTOCHEMISTRY. The bark contains tannin, catechol, sterol, and organic calciumcompounds.

PHARMACOLOGY. Oxytocic activity of the plant was seen in rat and human isolateduterine preparations. Estrogen-primed or gravid uterus was more sensitive to the action of the alcoholic extract.

ASHOKA SIDE EFFECTS. In the commonly used doses side effects are rare.

ASHOKA FORMULATIONS AND DOSAGE :
Ashokarishta. 15 - 30 ml b.i.d. / t.i.d.
Ashokkwath. 15 - 30 ml b.i.d.
Seed powder. 1 - 3 gms b.i.d.
Flower powder. 1 - 3 gms b.i.d.
Ashokghrita. 5 gms b.i.d.

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Saraca indica Bark Extract Shows In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibreast Cancer Activity and Does Not Exhibit Toxicological Effects

Saraca indica Bark Extract Shows In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibreast Cancer Activity and Does Not Exhibit Toxicological Effects

1 Division of Toxicology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, BS-10/1, Sector 10, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, P.O. Box 173, Lucknow 226031, India
2 Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, BS-10/1, Sector 10, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, P.O. Box 173, Lucknow 226031, India
3 Division of Pharmacokinetics & Metabolism, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, BS-10/1, Sector 10, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, P.O. Box 173, Lucknow 226031, India
4 Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, New Delhi 110 001, India
5 Division of Botany, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, BS-10/1, Sector 10, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, P.O. Box 173, Lucknow 226031, India

Received 14 November 2014; Accepted 7 January 2015

Academic Editor: Francisco Javier Romero

Copyright © 2015 Navneet Kumar Yadav et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License. which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Medicinal plants are used as a complementary and alternative medicine in treatment of various diseases including cancer worldwide, because of their ease of accessibility and cost effectiveness. Multicomposed mixture of compounds present in a plant extract has synergistic activity, increases the therapeutic potential many folds, compensates toxicity, and increases bioavailability. Saraca indica (family Caesalpiniaceae) is one of the most ancient sacred plants with medicinal properties, exhibiting a number of pharmacological effects. Antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and toxicological evaluation of Saraca indica bark extract (SIE) were carried out in the present study. The results of the study indicated that this herbal preparation has antioxidant and antibreast cancer activity. Toxicological studies suggest that SIE is safer to use and may have a potential to be used as complementary and alternative medicine for breast cancer therapy.